Change, transformation, renewal – tools for inspiring people

When talking about change, I usually like to use the term renewal. The word describes constant change through small actions and, perhaps, has a more positive ring than “major change”. Today, however, let us talk about change. Organisations feel pressured into change by the shift in working life, by the industry and by stakeholders – from both inside and outside the organisation.

Usually, the requirements for change reach and are reflected on each organisational level. The complex nature of change requires planning and structure in order to succeed. Through our customers, I can see ongoing processes of change and renewal that we can promote and enable in cooperation with people. A successful change is the sum of many parts, the identification of which usually yields the necessary prerequisites for following through with the change.

The changing operating environment requires new ways of operating in organisations. Developing the culture and investing in the development of individuals spurs the ability to change.

The changing operating environment requires new ways of operating in organisations. It is our view that developing the culture and investing in the development of individuals spurs the ability to change. But what else should we take into consideration when planning a change?

Working together and ensuring dialogue is an excellent foundation, and making the management and other key individuals committed to the change is an important prerequisite. In addition, selecting change operators within the organisation may be a functional idea. The significance of trust is emphasised during periods of transition. People tend to trust the people and things they know. Simply pointing this out illustrates the timeframe of change – good results are not achieved through quick or agile experiments unless they are also well planned.

Change is a complicated process, combining the management of business objectives and the leadership of people. In business planning, building inspiring goals and vision, allocating resources and the changes related to organisational structures challenge the emotions, views and concerns related to leadership. It is often easier to change business operations than to make people engaged in the change. Each person is likely to primarily think about the impact of the change on their everyday work.

 

Our 5 tips for inspiring individuals for a shared change process:

  1. Communicate honestly and openly. Questions of uncertainty and doubt can be approached by building dialogue together.
     
  2. Work with the people to form the change-related objectives that inspire them.
     
  3. Remember to emphasise the positive aspects: which points in our ways of working and culture are already good and functional, what are some new points we could discover and learn?
     
  4. Determinedly expedite things while paying attention to people’s feelings in various stages.
     
  5. Be personally honest and highlight potential challenges and errors – they are an excellent learning opportunity.
     

My colleagues and I want to be involved in making people enthusiastic about changes. Investing in the human perspective in a timely, sufficient manner strengthens the culture, builds trust and enhances commitment to the objectives of the change.

Did you know that, in addition to providing change-related monitoring indicators and surveys, we will comprehensively help you to succeed in your change processes?