A skilled but uncooperative expert – is that a problem?

Managers and supervisors have known for a long time that mere expertise is not enough. Regardless of management level, company size or industry, becoming successful as a supervisor requires the ability and desire to lead people, issues and oneself effectively. These aspects have been well identified in development programmes aimed at supervisors.

In developing experts and personnel, most organisations focus excessively on professional skills and either ignore other areas or reduce them to a supporting role. This is probably due to the assumption that only professional skills and the ability to make things happen truly matter, and therefore their development is prioritised. People often assume that other areas of knowledge cannot be improved cost-efficiently.

An engaged employee needs no motivation or supervision

The most successful companies have understood that investing in employee engagement is crucial for the company’s competitiveness. It translates into excellent individual performance and efficiency and, in particular, proactivity and assuming responsibility for one’s own role and for the goals of the team and the entire organisation. Good performance arises out of good professional skills, but also out of excellent workplace skills and the desire to do one’s best. No organisation should afford not to develop the workplace skills of their entire personnel.

The most successful companies have understood that investing in employee engagement is crucial for the company’s competitiveness.

How can individual ways of working be streamlined both effectively and cost-efficiently?

Development work is effective when it leads to tangible changes in someone’s ways of working. Cost-efficiency, on the other hand, means that the development investment pays for itself quickly.

Individual ways of working can be developed very efficiently by using individual 270 degree working community feedback coupled with a supporting utilisation process. The effectiveness and cost-efficiency of the method are based on targeted feedback that enables individual development and motivates development of one’s ways of working.

Individual development is best supported by an open atmosphere and dialogue

Targeted feedback from one’s most important internal partners enables development based on individual needs and the situation at hand. This makes it easier to identify one’s unique development needs and aim the development measures at those issues and ways of working whose development is the most beneficial to the individual. Individual feedback also enables identifying the most essential strengths of one’s ways of working and ensuring their preservation in the future.

Tangible feedback on an individual’s work is a motivating starting point for development, as the individual knows that the feedback is based on the experiences and expectations of the people they depend on the most in the working community.

Tangible feedback on an individual’s work is a motivating starting point for development, as the individual knows that the feedback is based on the experiences and expectations of the people they depend on the most in the working community. Furthermore, these are often the people who know the individual’s ways of working the best. Motivation is increased further by knowing that in addition to feedback, the same people can also support in working on development solutions.

Coming up with direct development solutions usually takes more than just feedback and an individual report based on it. It is important to interpret feedback openly and try to find just a few clear areas for development, as no one can develop too many areas simultaneously. When a colleague, supervisor or even an outsider helps us to interpret feedback, it becomes easier for us to see our blind spots. However, this requires that we have the courage and open-mindedness to look at ourselves as the object of development.